Definition

iSeries (i5, i5 Series)

iSeries is IBM's midrange server line, designed for small businesses and departments in large enterprises. The product line, formerly known as AS/400 (still the preferred name among many long-time users ), was renamed in 2000 with the introduction of the V5R1 operating system and 800 line of servers. i5 is the latest hardware evolution of one of IBM's most widely-installed product lines. iSeries servers use IBM's Power5 microprocessors and are capable of running five different operating systems at the same time (AIX, Windows, Linux, OS/400, and i5/OS) on multiple partitions. IBM also offers p5 (or pSeries) servers for large enterprise users who want to run Unix systems or who need more scalability.

According to Chief Scientist IBM iSeries, Dr. Frank G. Soltis, the iSeries is used by businesses all over the world, is sold in more countries than McDonald's hamburgers, and has the largest number of customers of any IBM server.

Search400.com expert John Brandt explains the advantages of upgrading from AS/400 hardware to the i5:

  • 64-bit and 128-bit computing
  • Better performance than the AS/400 system
  • Hardware management across all partitions from a single device
  • Hardware sharing, including tape backup, across all operating systems
  • Support for single signon across any Kerberos-compatible system

This was last updated in April 2007
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Email Alerts

Register now to receive Search400.com-related news, tips and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

More News and Tutorials

  • Fast track to iSeries learning resources

    Here's a fast reference to all of our learning resources on Search400.com. You can find information on autonomic computing, backup and recovery, career resources, and more.

  • Authenticate use of Web applications via user profiles

    One technique you can use to authenticate users to the HTTP server is to request and validate an OS/400 user profile and password. In most cases, however, you'll want to use this method only if the Web application user population is limited to people in your company who already have OS/400 user profiles.

  • Easy code copying -- without CODE400

    Try this method of copying code to make your life a little easier.

Do you have something to add to this definition? Let us know.

Send your comments to techterms@whatis.com

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: