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Access path and an open data path differences

On AS/400 DB2 an access path describes the order in which the rows are retrieved from a database file. The open data path (ODP) is the path through which all input and output operations are performed on a database file. As data is retrieved from or inserted into the file, the ODP will use an access path to navigate to a row within in the file.

What is the difference between an access path and an open data path? When would an access path be created, and...

when would an open data path will be created? Can you provide an example of when to use each?

An access path describes the order in which the rows are retrieved from a database file. If the rows in the file are accessed in a physical sequence, that is known as an arrival sequence access path. If the rows need to be processed in an ordered manner, then a keyed access path is needed to sort the data in the specified order. With DB2 for iSeries, keyed access paths are supplied to DB2 by creating a keyed logical file, keyed physical file, or SQL index.

An access path and an open data path are used together to process the rows in a database file.

The open data path (ODP) is the path through which all input and output operations are performed on a database file. The ODP is used to connect the requesting program with the data in the file. As data is retrieved from or inserted into the file, the ODP will use an access path to navigate to a row within in the file. If the rows need to be processed in a sorted owner, then someone will need to supply a keyed access path by creating a keyed physical file, keyed logical file or SQL index.

An ODP is created and used each time that a file is opened or when an SQL statement is executed. There are ways to have an ODP shared or reused instead of creating the ODP each time.
This was last published in June 2009

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